The Orthodox Position on War

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A great article outlining the Orthodox Church perspective on war in general in light of current events:

Four great pericope’s from this article [emphasis added]:

In his book Contemporary Moral Issues Facing Orthodox Christians, Fr. Stanley Harakas says, “the Church as a whole and its ethical teaching is opposed to war, which it sees as a most terrible evil which nations inflict upon each other. In the strict sense of the word, there is no good war.” From an Orthodox perspective there is no possibility of a just war, as all war is evil and therefore cannot be justified for any reason.

The entirety of the Orthodox Spiritual life requires humanity to be at peace with itself and with one another. The Great Litany is used each time the Orthodox gather for worship. The litany begins with the words, “In peace let us pray to the Lord,” and the word peace appears three more times in that litany alone. During the services of the Orthodox Church the faithful continually pray for peace so that we may live out our spiritual lives in harmony with all of humanity. We are to share God’s peace with those around us and in doing so we imitate the sacrificial love of Jesus Christ and we participate in His work.

From an Orthodox perspective there is no justification for war; even a war of defense is a lesser evil but is still an evil. The Orthodox Church, by faith and practice, believes that peace is normal and just. Therefore, war would be not only evil but it would be non-normative. We are to seek peace in each and every situation. The Greek Fathers wrote about peace in all situations and as such there would be no Orthodox Just War Theory as exists in Western Theological thought.

It is a result of our fallen human nature that there is evil in this world and sometimes violence is necessary to overcome that evil. It is my prayer that a peaceful solution can be found to end this horrific situation in Syria and in Egypt but if peace does not work that hostilities are kept to a minimum.

Anabaptists will share a deep resonance with our Orthodox brothers and sisters on this issue. Though, it should be noted that even in the Latin Church (Catholic), both Pope John Paul II and Benedict XVI (and I would be shocked if not Francis) posited that it is simply not possible to meet the criteria for a just war anymore, given the weapons available today.

Read the rest of the article here.